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GLOSSARY OF INGREDIENTS IN CHINESE RECIPES

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

O

Oil - Polyunsaturated oils are preferred for Chinese cooking. Chinese consider peanut oil as being the most flavorsome, but corn, safflower, and soya oils are used. Crisco is not suitable for cooking Chinese dishes as it tends to jelly when cold and spoil the texture of the food. In China , soya oil is more widely used because it is most available. In general, vegetable-oil-cooked things can be eaten cold or warmed over, while lard-cooked things are good only the first time Used oil can be saved, but strain it through several layers of cheesecloth and store it in the refrigerator. Discard frying oils that have darkened in color, that flow more slowly than they did originally, or that foam to the top of the pot when you put the food in. Store unused oils in a cool place. See also smoking point.

Onion - appreciated both as a vegetable and as a condiment in ChineseSpanish onions food, in addition to having many medicinal properties. With a characteristic of strong flavor Red OnionsWhite Onionand odor. The onion is made up of numerous concentric layers of fleshy, juicy whitish leaves, which are covered by several outer layers of paper-thin skin. Spanish onions are among the mildest, while white onions are mild and sweet, and red onions are the sweetest. Certain varieties known as scallions, green onions, or spring onions are often sold fresh in bunches. Learn more on how to prepare onion.

Orange peel - is in fact dried tangerine peel with a strong orange flavor. Soak in hot water for 20 minutes and use in stir fries. Thinly pared fresh orange or tangerine peel may be substituted.

Oyster sauce - A dark brown, delicate sauce made from oysters and soy sauce, is a staple condiment and seasoning in Chinese cooking that adds richess to dishes without dominating their natural flavors. Available in cans or bottles from Chinese or oriental provision stores. No substitute-omit from the recipe if unavailable.

Oyster mushrooms - A fan-shaped mushroom with white flesh and a gray to brown exterior. This soft, moist fungus has a peppery, robust flavor when raw, and is often used in salads. The flavor softens when cooked, and oyster mushrooms are a nice addition to casseroles, soups or stir-fried dishes. Available in some areas year-round, particularly in specialty produce and Asian markets; canned oyster mushrooms, which should be rinsed before using, are also available.

Learn About Chinese Cooking Ingredients Video

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Learn How to Prepare an Onion for Chinese Cooking Video

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How to Remove Fibers from Peapods for Chinese Food Ingredients Video

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

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Last Modified: 11/28/11.