Chinese Food Recipes and Cooking
Chinese food need never be a once-a-week-restaurant treat again!
Free mouth watering Chinese recipes, easy to follow & cook, Chinese cooking is simply rewarding!

Home
Chinese Recipes
Chinese Salad
Tasty Soup
Fluffy Rice
Squids & Crabs


Noodles Delight
Chicken Recipes
Succulent Pork
Beef Recipe
Fresh Fish
Lamb & Mutton
Seafood Platter
Crunchy Vegetables
Nutritious Tofu
Assorted Dim Sum
Delicious Eggs
Shrimps & Prawns

Soothing Chinese Tea
Sauces & Seasoning
Chinese Desserts
Snacks & Appetizers
Cooking Methods
Chinese Kitchen


Glossary of Ingredients
Glossary of Cooking Terms
Kitchen Guide & Tips
Measurement Conversion
Food Articles & Fun Stuff
Learn to Speak Chinese
Chinese Restaurants
International Recipes
Asian Recipes
Chinese Cook Book
Chinese Cooking Videos
   
 
 

GLOSSARY OF INGREDIENTS IN CHINESE RECIPES

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

G & H

Gailan - see Chinese broccoli

Garlic - A member of the onion family, garlic's pungent flavor andBulb of Garlic aroma is an essential ingredient in Szechuan and northern-style cooking. When buying, look for plump, round heads that are free from sprouts. Once peeled, the cloves can be minced, chopped, crushed Clove of garlicunder the flat of a knife. The more finely the garlic is chopped or smashed, the stronger its flavor. Garlic can be found in powder, chopped, and paste form. While these preparations are practical, it is best to use fresh garlic for maximum flavor. Garlic should be stored in a dry and cool place and not refrigerated. Learn more on how to prepare garlic and more...

Garlic chives - see Chinese chives

Ginger root - Knobbly and light brown, ginger root is u sed widely in Chinese food for its sharp, peppery, spicy, slightly sweet flavor and isGinger root especially good with fish as a "de-fisher". Ginger, when used in cooking is sliced into 1/16 inch slices. The slices are usually not eaten. When used for dipping together with vinegar, it is in fine shreds or fine dots and as much of it as will stick to the dipping piece will be eaten. Fresh ginger is peeled before using. The younger, less pungent ginger is best used in stir fried or steamed dishes while the harsher peppery mature ginger is good for braised dishes. It can be obtained from many supermarkets and Asian markets and is best kept in the refrigerator vegetable compartment, tightly wrapped in a paper towel placed inside a plastic bag. Learn more how to prepare ginger and tips. The medicinal values of ginger.

Ginger sherry - This is made in the kitchen. Cut 1-2 oz. fresh ginger into thin strips. Turn them into a bottle and cover with a warm brown sherry. Leave to infuse, strain and use as directed. For 2 oz. fresh ginger, ½ bottle sherry will be the right amount to use.

GinkgoGinkgo - A nut from the center of the inedible fruit of the maidenhair tree. This nut turns bright green when cooked and has a delicately sweet flavor.

Glass Noodles - see Cellophane Noodles

Golden Needle - see Tiger lily buds

Golden Needle Mushroom - see Enoki mushroom

Grass Mushroom - see Straw mushroom

Green onion - see Scallion

Ham - is cured leg of pork. You can buy whole or half hams. Most hams offered in supermarkets are fully cooked but read the label to be sure. Recipe : Ham with Lotus Seeds in Honey Sauce

Hoi sin sauce - A sweet, smooth, brownish-red Chinese barbecue sauce (not to be confused with western or American barbecue sauce), and usually containing soya beans, garlic, chilies and other spices that are constantly used in Egg rolls, dumplings and barbecued pork (Cha Siu). It also makes a terrific barbecue sauce for chicken or beef. Best known as the sauce served with Peking Duck, also known as Peking sauce, it is sold in both cans and bottles (jar)-if you use it only rarely, it is better to buy a bottle, which will keep better. If you are using canned, remove any leftover sauce and store it in a screw-top container in the refrigerator. It will keep for up to six months. It can be obtained from Chinese or oriental provision stores and Asian markets.

Hair seaweed - Also known as black moss or black hair, these fine threads of black dried vegetable resemble hair and is tasteless. Slippery after being cooked, it is a traditional ingredient used in some vegetarian Buddhist dishes, soups and as garnish. Called "Fat Choy" in Cantonese, although of different Chinese character but sounds very much like "Good Fortune" and thus it is a must for Chinese homes to serve a dish that employs "Fat Choy" during Chinese New Year. Soak the hair seaweed briefly in warm water and rinse before use. Hair seaweed can be found in Asian supermarkets and Chinese markets.

Hot Bean Sauce -This sauce is a combination of hot chili sauce and brown bean sauce. It is used in spicy Szechuan and Hunan dishes.

Hot Chili Oil - Used abundantly in many regions in China , this is vegetable oil in which dried fiery hot chili peppers and other spices have been fried. When the oil becomes very spicy, the spices are removed and the oil transferred to an airtight jar. The hot oil is used as a condiment at the table or stirred into a dish during the final stages of cooking and is good in stir-fries, noodles and dumplings.

Hot Chili Sauce -This fiery sauce is made from crushed dried hot chilies, sweet red peppers and soy sauce. If you like Szechuan or Hunan food, this sauce is essential. It is available in jars or you can make your own.

Hot Mustard Powder - Hot mustard powder is ground mustard seeds. It makes a very spicy condiment when combined with equal amounts of water and stirred until smooth. Serve it with egg rolls or dumplings or add it to salad dressing.

Hundred-year Egg - An egg that has been preserved with a coatingSliced 100 Year Egg of lime, ashes and salt before being buried for 100 days. The lime has a petrifying effect, making the egg look like it has been buried for at least a century. The black outer shell is removed to expose an amber-colored white and dark golden yolk. The egg has a pungent 100 Year Eggcheese-like flavor. Chicken eggs are most often used, though duck and goose eggs can be substituted. Hundred-year eggs can be found in Chinese markets and will keep at room temperature (under 70ºF) for up to two weeks or can be refrigerated up to a month; usually eaten uncooked, for breakfast or as an appetizer. Soy sauce or minced ginger makes a good accompaniment. Also called century egg, thousand-year egg and Ming Dynasty egg. Recipe : Steamed Egg with Salted, Pickled and Quail Egg

Learn About Chinese Cooking Ingredients Video

Learn How to Prepare Broccoli for your Favorite Dishes Video

Learn How to Prepare an Onion for Chinese Cooking Video

Learn How to Prepare Bok Choy for Chinese Food Video

Some Basic Ingredients for Chinese Food Video

How to Remove Fibers from Peapods for Chinese Food Ingredients Video

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

GO TO TOP

   

Custom Search
Bookmark and Share
Today's Tip/Quote
NEW ARTICLES
 
 
cheap China products on DHgate.com
Cheap China products on DHgate.com  
 
 

Home :: Links Exchange :: Contact Us :: Privacy Policy :: Terms of Use :: Sitemap
Asian Recipes

Copyright © 2016 Chinese Food Recipes.com. All Rights Reserved. Your ultimate Chinese food and Asian food recipes site.
Last Modified: 11/28/11.